Author: jeremyhadall

Myth Busting Cobots

“In ten years’ time, every human operator will have a human co-worker, a cobot, working next to them.” Or so they say, but is that true? Will every industrial robot we install in ten years be a cobot? Does it need to be and what the heck is a cobot anyway! Maybe we should deal with that last question first. It might surprise you to learn that every robot sold today is “collaborative” if it complies with ISO10218 (Part 1), and if it is sold in the UK, it probably will. That’s because the standard allows collaboration through a...

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The New Frontier

Report from the McKinsey Global Institute It is easy to become blasé about technological progress in this non-stop, 24/7, digitaleverything-always-and-everywhere era. We take technological advances almost for granted and are frustrated when an app that streams the latest Hollywood movies crashes, or a smartphone which has many times the processing power of a 1980s Cray 2 supercomputer does not fire up the moment we press the “on” button. We forget that it was not always this easy. Not so long ago, we had to go to libraries to look up quotations and insert compact discs into an audio system...

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Improving productivity with collaboration and automation

In an exclusive interview for AUTOMATED, Jonathan Wilkins talks to Jeremy Hadall, chief technologist of the Robotics and Automation division at the Manufacturing Technology Centre, an independent Research & Technology Organisation (RTO) with the objective of bridging the gap between academia and industry. AUTOMATED: Tell me more about the HVM Catapult. How does robotics fit into the application? Hadall: The High Value Manufacturing Catapult is a collection of seven research organisations that work with industry to translate ideas and technology concepts into commercial applications. The seven centres are spread across the UK and work with companies of all sizes,...

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SubCon 2017 – Jeremy Hadall Q & As

Much has been written about the rise of the machines recently with doom and gloom about mass unemployment and the ‘hollowing out’ of the middle class. However, the reality of previous industrial revolutions and new technologies is that the nature of work changes. For example, according to the Office for National Statistics farming and fishing accounted for 22 per cent of jobs in 1841, yet today with the introduction of mechanisation to feed a growing population the industry supports just two per cent of the UK’s workforce. However, in the same period, overall employment rates have risen and new...

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